SaaS

5 reasons why you should take Single Sign-on seriously

F2MKE BlogA recent report by the credit checking company Experian warned that the average online consumer had 26 separate online logins but just 5 different passwords.

Two thirds of people have accounts they no longer use but have not closed down, leaving them vulnerable, the research found.  Every week we learn about new and major hacks leading to the comprising of our usernames and passwords.

In July 2012 we have already heard about the ‘loss’ of 450,000 Yahoo identities, over 1 Million Android forum IDs, 20% of all Microsoft account credentials – where they had been reused on other websites – and LinkedIn hacked twice in as many months.

It is all too easy to reuse the same ID – typically your email address together with your favourite password – when registering with different websites online.  The problem – and the very real threat – is that it only takes one of these websites to fail in keeping that ID and password safe and suddenly your online information and access across many different websites is in jeopardy.  What’s more, you may not even realise until you go to apply for a credit card, loan, mobile phone, or mortgage and are refused.  Perhaps worse still, the debt collectors come knocking upon your door!  Even if you do discover that a website you use has ben compromised, can you really remember all of the websites that you signed up to using the same ID and password so that you can sign-in and change your login credentials?

Standards-based Single Sign-on is one killer tool in your defence arsenal!  The following 5 reasons pretty much cover the benefits of using the Single Sign-on technology Oauth for your social online world and Shibboleth if you are in the classroom.

Popular Oauth Identity Providers include Twitter, Facebook and Google.  For more about the prevailing Shibboleth standard in education, simply search this website.

Now for those 5 reasons:

1) When you connect to a new website, application, or service provider using Oauth or Shibboleth, your username and password is not shared with, or stored in, that provider’s system.  If it’s hacked, your ID and password stays safe.

2) It is good practice, alongside having a complex password, to change that password often.  In the Shibboleth and Oauth Single Sign-on model, you can do this just once and in one place resulting in all of your other online presences relating to this change.

3) If you suspect that your password has been compromised, as with (2), you change it once and in one place.  No need to try to remember what you’ve signed up for and how to get there!

4) A single username and password for everything leaves space in your memory for other things; like remembering to pick-up some milk, or the kids, on your way home from work.  Oh and less reason to write it down too!

5) There are SO many great online resources out there asking you to sign up.  Can you really trust the honesty and security of them all?  With true Single Sign-on you can register with the peace of mind that they haven’t got hold of your username and password – often they shouldn’t even need to ‘know’ other personal details such as your name.

So there you have it.  Single Sign-on together with a ‘strong’ and frequently changed password will keep thing more simple and more secure for your online adventures.

The quiet Google Apps and Chromebooks revolution

Over the past few weeks I have been assessing how best we can deploy and manage a set of Google Chromebooks to be piloted across a group of schools.  We already have an enterprise deployment of Google Apps for Education with approximately 130,000 users grouped into around 450 Organisational Units.  The entire user and organisational management is efficiently streamlined using the Systems Interoperability Framework (SIF); new users, transient users and leavers are all near-time captured through SIF making account management a breeze!

How does this work?  (1) The school Management Information System (MIS) is updated – pupils and staff intake, leavers, or changes – and modifications are transported securely via SIF and the (2) Zone Integration Server (ZIS) to the Identity Management (IdM) server.  Here users identities are matched or created.  (3) Then the identities are passed via SIF to the ZIS and then (4) on to Google Apps.

SIF Identity Management

Now here’s the cloud clever bit… Before deployment to your users, each Google Chromebook is registered with your organisation’s Google Apps domain using the management console.  Here you can define a multitude of policy options including which applications, or extensions, a user should, or should not, have access to.  Policies can be defined for different organisational units – pupils and staff, sales and marketing, etc. – and updated at any time.  Any user who signs-in in to any registered Chromebook will automatically receive the profile relevant to them.  Organisational Unit policy changes are automatically applied the next time a user signs-in, or after a set time period.

Chromebook Management

This is a fantastic example of how simple, powerful, efficient and cost effective cloud computing really can be.  No expensive domain servers to maintain and house.  No network intensive traditional roaming profiles.  Easy management from any place in the world with an Internet connection.  Flexible and mobile workforce and learners.

The Evolution of the Web

Whilst trawling for information on Chrome OS and its supporting devices to understand how these might be deployed and managed across a large estate, I stumbled upon this great interactive infographic, built in HTML5, which details the evolution of major web technologies and browsers.

The Evolution of the Web

 

http://evolutionofweb.appspot.com/

Barack Obama’s State of the Union Speech 2011 Wordled!

Barack Obama's State of the Union Speech 2011

Barack Obama's State of the Union Speech 2011